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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

8 edition of Representing popular sovereignty found in the catalog.

Representing popular sovereignty

the Constitution in American political culture

by Daniel Lessard Levin

  • 154 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading

Published by State University of New York Press in Albany .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Constitutional law -- United States.,
    • Political culture -- United States.,
    • Representative government and representation -- United States.,
    • United States Constitution Bicentennial, 1987-1991.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references ( p. 259-274) and index.

      StatementDaniel Lessard Levin.
      SeriesSUNY series, American constitutionalism, SUNY series in American constitutionalism.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsKF4552 .L476 1999
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxi, 283 p. ;
      Number of Pages283
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL366878M
      ISBN 100791441059, 0791441067
      LC Control Number98027368

      both the OAU and the AU represent the institutionalization of Pan-Africanism, this paper argues that by entrenching the notion of popular sovereignty in its constitution and peace and security institutions, the AU has a greater capacity to achieve the ideals of Pan-Africanism. Introduction. B. Grofman, in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, The USA has been a leader in defining standards of apportionment and districting to implement the principle of popular US House of Representatives was intended by its founders to be the representative chamber of a bicameral legislature and its apportionment rules were set up to require a purely.

      Rousseau on the Risks of Representing the Sovereign* Nadia Urbinati Rousseau über die Risiken der Repräsentation des Souveräns This article is a revised version of the second chapter of my book, Representative Democracy: on popular sovereignty as a . The principle of Popular Sovereignty states that all political power resides with the people. Therefore, the government can only govern with the consent of the people. For example, if the government want to pass a certain law, the law must be presented to the people in order for consideration.

      Popular Sovereignty. the people have power. Republicanism. elected representatives run the government. Federalism. sharing the power between the federal and state government. a book of essays and supporting the ratification of the new constitution. Bill . Republics and popular monarchies are theoretically based on popular sovereignty. However, a legalistic notion of popular sovereignty does not necessarily imply an effective, functioning democracy: a party or even an individual dictator may claim to represent the will of the people, and rule in its name, pretending to detain Size: 87KB.


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Representing popular sovereignty by Daniel Lessard Levin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Using the events of the Constitution’s Bicentennial from to as a case study, Representing Popular Sovereignty explores the contradiction between the Constitution’s importance as a political document and its weakness as a symbol in American popular culture Cited by: 7.

The NOOK Book (eBook) of the Representing Popular Sovereignty by Daniel Lessard Levin at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or more. Due to COVID, orders may be delayed.

Using the events of the Constitution’s Bicentennial from to as a case study, Representing Popular Sovereignty explores the contradiction between the Constitution’s importance as a political document and its weakness as a symbol in American popular : Representative government and popular sovereignty; Political Representation.

Political Representation Most research in political science presumes that the purpose of representative government is to represent the will of the people by translating popular sentiment or public interest into governmental policy.

Email your librarian or Cited by: Representing popular sovereignty: the Constitution in American political culture by Levin, Daniel Lessard, Pages: Using the events of the Constitution's Bicentennial from to as a case study, Representing Popular Sovereignty explores the contradiction between the Constitution's importance as a political document and its weakness as a symbol in American popular culture.

In order to understand popular sovereignty in an era of globalization, this book argues that focus should be put on current struggles between rulers and ruled, as well as on current transformations of the relationship between public and private spheres.

The book covers core topics such as the discourse of sovereignty, the global expansion of sovereignty, the rise of popular sovereignty, and the relationship between sovereignty and human rights. It concludes by examining future challenges facing sovereignty in an era of by: The following chapter has two main sections that partially overlap.

Perhaps they just convey the same idea in two different ways. In the first section I present a conceptual analysis of the terms people, sovereignty, and popular sovereignty to reach the conclusion that in a constitutional democracy sovereignty, and so political authority, is divided and shared among different state organs.

popular sovereignty in the sense that it is usually understood – to undermine the idea that government can adequately represent the people. To avoid misunderstanding, let me make one point clear at the outset: The suspicion of government efforts to turn popular sovereignty into.

SUNY series in American constitutionalism. "Using the events of the Constitution's Bicentennial from to as a case study, Representing Popular Sovereignty explores the contradiction between the Constitution's importance as a political document and its weakness as a symbol in American popular culture."--Jacket.

mations of popular sovereignty and of a common “weal” or commonwealth. It is a version of this conception that is defended, for instance, by Marsilius of Padua, who identifies the executive source of law as “the people or the universal body of the citizens or else its prevailing part [ valentior pars ]”.

The book shares new insights into sovereignty as a foundational concept of constitutional and public international law, shows the essential connection between public (international) law, analytical and political philosophy and offers a clear explanatory framework for debates surrounding sovereignty.

Introduction: Constitutionalism as Culture 1 --Chapter 1 The Problem of an Abstract Constitution 13 --Chapter 2 The Conscious Creation of Constitutional Culture 41 --Chapter 3 The Constitution in Public History 69 --Chapter 4 The Constitution as a Written Document 99 --Chapter 5 The Constitution as a Symbol of Democracy --Chapter 6 The Constitution in Educational Policy --Conclusion:.

The only part of the conduct of any one, for which he is amenable to society, is that which concerns others. In the part which merely concerns himself, his independence is, of right, absolute.

Over himself, over his own body and mind, the individual is sovereign.” ― John Stuart Mill, On Liberty. Popular sovereignty, in U.S. history, a controversial political doctrine that the people of federal territories should decide for themselves whether their territories would enter the Union as free or slave states.

Its enemies, especially in New England, called it ‘squatter sovereignty.’ Learn more about the doctrine. This collaborative volume offers the first historical reconstruction of the concept of popular sovereignty from antiquity to the twentieth century. First formulated between the late sixteenth and mid-seventeenth centuries, the various early modern conceptions of the doctrine were heavily indebted to Roman reflection on forms of government and.

Searching for Popular Sovereignty Gerald Russello Judicial Monarchs: Court Power and the Case for Restoring Popular Sovereignty in the United States might be placed alongside the recent tome by Justice Stephen Breyer, Making Our Democracy Work, each representing a strand of the two major ways of thinking abut the power of judicial review.

Popular Sovereignty. Popular sovereignty is government based on consent of the people. The government’s source of authority is the people, and its power is not legitimate if it disregards the will of the people.

Government established by free choice of the people is expected to serve the people, who have sovereignty, or supreme power. Popular sovereignty is the basic premise of government that all power, particularly legislative and executive power, rests in the will of the people.

The concept is fundamental to any people who claim to be self governing. Books shelved as sovereignty-of-god: Chance and the Sovereignty of God: A God-Centered Approach to Probability and Random Events by Vern Sheridan Poythre.Popular sovereignty in its modern sense, is an idea that dates to the social contracts school (midth to midth centuries), represented by Thomas Hobbes (–), John Locke (–), and Jean-Jacques Rousseau (–), author of The Social Contract, a prominent political work that clearly highlighted the ideals of "general will" and further matured the idea of popular sovereignty.Popular sovereignty definition is - a doctrine in political theory that government is created by and subject to the will of the people.